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Child Support Video Information

Child Support Information Videos

Oregon Child Support

Oregon is like many states in America when it comes to child support. There may be a few differences in Oregon child support compared to other parts of the country, however. Each state has their own special ways in which they outline child support and Oregon is no different. Parents in Oregon are responsible for the support of their child/children. The amount an individual pays in Oregon child support depends on the custody arrangement that is outlined by the courts.

Find out more in our Oregon Child Support Explainer Video

Child Support in Texas

In Texas, a non-custodial parent pays child support to help the custodial parent take care of their child or children. Although some courts will dictate that both parents must support their kid, it is often that the parents without custody pays maintenance. The amount of money a person pays in child support varies. The amount paid is a percentage of the non-custodial parent’s income. Parents can pay more than the money that is outlined by the court order. However, non-custodial parents cannot pay less than is mandated.

Find out more in our Texas Child Support Explainer Video

Child Support in Alaska

In Alaska, both parents of a child have the legal responsibility to support their child. Regardless if the parents are married or not, Alaska child support dictates that the parents are obliged to support the child or children financially.

The courts in Alaska outline the amount of money parents must pay in child support each month. Alaska child support focuses on the parents’ income and it is the chief factor in determining the amount of money paid.

Alaska child support calculator

The parents’ monthly or annual gross incomes from all sources will be tallied when deciding the monthly monetary figure paid in Alaska child support. Unemployment, benefits, and other items are also factored in when determining child support payment amounts.

Once parents determine their gross monthly or yearly income, they can figure out their net incomes. This occurs by subtracting income taxes, mandatory union dues, mandatory retirement contributions, some voluntary retirement contributions, social security contributions, court-ordered payments such as child support for children of other relationships, and the cost of necessary work-related child-care.

 

Find out more in our Alaska Child Support Explainer Video

Child Support in CO

Colorado child support is the right of the child involved. The amount a parent pays in Colorado child support is outlined in the state’s child support guidelines. Colorado child support depends on the amount of money a non-custodial parent “would have” spent on the child if the couple was still together.

When parents get divorced or child support is calculated, it is the non-custodial parent that pays the custodial parent a monthly amount. The non-custodial parent is the parent that has fewer contact hours with the child than the custodial parent. The custodial parent is the parent that the child lives with. In some cases, parents split custody, meaning that the child lives 50% of the time with one parent and 50% of the time with the other parent.

Find out more in our Colorado Child Support Explainer Video

Child Support in Florida

Florida uses a program known as the Income Shares Model when determining the amount of money a parent pays in child support. The state of Florida ensures that both parents, regardless if they are married or unmarried, financially support their children. Both parents are obligated by the state to pay for their children and ensure they are looked after.

Find out more in our Florida Child Support Explainer Video

Child Support in Illinois

In Illinois, parents are responsible to take care of their children. This is even true when parents get divorced and children do not live full-time with one of the parents. The parent with custody of the child is known as the custodial parent. The custodial parent is the individual with the majority of contact hours with the child. The non-custodial parent is the parent with fewer contact hours with the child. It is the non-custodial parent’s responsibility to pay child support to the custodial parent.

Illinois courts assume that the custodial parent also pays child support. However, these payments are made throughout the month on the care of the child, rather than in a lump sum once a month.

Find out more in our Illinois Child Support Explainer Video

Child Support in Iowa

In Iowa, child support is paid by the non-custodial parent. The non-custodial parent is the one with the fewest hours of contact time with the child. The custodial parent is the parent with the most contact hours with the child. In the court’s view, the custodial parent still pays child support. There payments are figured into the everyday activities and other items that must be paid for by the custodial parent.

The custodial parent’s payments are, in theory, the same as the non-custodial parent. However, instead of making one monthly lump sum payment, the custodial parent payments cover things throughout the month to take care of the child.

Find out more in our Iowa Child Support Explainer Video

Child Support in NJ

Parents in New Jersey have the financial duty to take care of and support their children. In New Jersey, parents are responsible for ensuring their child has clothing to wear, a safe place to live, and food to eat. Regardless of a couple’s relationship, they must provide financial support for their children. Child support in New Jersey is set out to help custodial parents with the financial needs of taking care of a child. Costs incurred by a custodial parent can range from food and clothing to healthcare and education.

Find out more in our NJ Child Support Explainer Video

Child Support in PA

All parents in Pennsylvania have the financial duty to take care of and support their children. In Pennsylvania, a child support order mandates that one of the parents makes a monthly payment to cover the cost of the child if the parents are divorced. These costs can range from food and clothing to housing and education.

Typically, child support payments are made from one parent to the other, for example, from the father to the mother. The non-custodial parent will make the monthly payment to the custodial parent. Why does the non-custodial parent make payments to the custodial parent? This is simply done as the custodial parent takes on the costs of raising the child full-time.

Find out more in our PA Child Support Explainer Video

Child Support in West Virginia

Parents in West Virginia are responsible for the care of their children. West Virginia child support payments depend on the number of children a parent has and the combined monthly incomes of both parents. WV child support is determined by a set of guidelines outlined by the state.

The court determines the fairness of the guidelines. West Virginia’s courts decide on a reasonable amount of child support based the two factors of number of children and combined monthly incomes of both parents. Although the court sets out a specified amount of child support that must be paid based on the guidelines, parents may choose to pay more than required.

Find out more in our WV Child Support Explainer Video